Posts Tagged With: Egyptology

Brooklyn Museum

The Brooklyn Museum has something called Target First Saturdays. At night you can visit the museum for free and the special exhibits for a small fee. They also have music and other performances. I have been wanting to go to the Brooklyn Museum for the longest time because they have a great Egyptian section. It’s considered one of the best in the world. Additionally, John Paul Gaultier has a temporary exhibit there that I wanted to see. The exhibit is usually $15, but was only $10 because of Target First Saturday. We waited online for well over a hour, but it was worth it in the end. The mannequins for the exhibit were images of real models so they blinked, talked, sang, etc. Creepy and cool at the same time. My pictures are below:

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Scavenger Hunt at the MET

I hosted a scavenger hunt at the MET this past Friday. The MET is probably my favorite museum in the world. I have spent countless hours there and though I think I have seen it all I always stumble upon something new. After years of searching I finally found Michelangelo’s the Young Archer. They always change its location. I just randomly stumbled upon it. I have never been around Christmas so that was cool. I also had a n Egyptology lecture in the G level which was nice. I did two of the new exhibits one consisted of beautiful jewelry (no pics allowed) and the other one was on Hinduism and allowed me to enter the Jain Meeting Hall (one of my favorites). Some pictures from Friday are below:

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Mallawi Museum in Egypt was Looted

I’ve been meaning to post about this all week, but it has been a busy week. The Mallawi Museum was broken into and the artifacts were looted. They also killed the security guard/ticket taker. Almost everything was taken and what wasn’t taken was damaged. About 1,040 items were taken and to date 90 have been returned. Below you’ll find more information about the incident. The article below belongs to Yahoo and the Associated Press. To read the original article please click here.

To view the salvaging of the museum click here

To view the damage on 8/17 click here

To view the list of stolen items click here

Egypt’s devastating museum looting latest casualty

Associated Press

AYA BATRAWY August 19, 2013

CAIRO (AP) — As violent clashes roiled Egypt, looters made away with a prized 3,500-year-old limestone statue, ancient beaded jewelry and more than 1,000 other artifacts in the biggest theft to hit an Egyptian museum in living memory.

The scale of the looting of the Malawi Museum in the southern Nile River city of Minya laid bare the security vacuum that has taken hold in cities outside Cairo, where police have all but disappeared from the streets. It also exposed how bruised and battered the violence has left Egypt.

For days after vandals ransacked the building Wednesday, there were no police or soldiers in sight as groups of teenage boys burned mummies and broke limestone sculptures too heavy for the thieves to carry away. The security situation remained precarious Monday as gunmen atop nearby buildings fired on a police station near the museum.

Among the stolen antiquities was a statue of the daughter of Pharaoh Akhenaten, who ruled during the 18th dynasty. Archaeologist Monica Hanna described it as a “masterpiece”. Other looted items included gold and bronze Greco-Roman coins, pottery and bronze-detailed sculptures of animals sacred to Thoth, a deity often represented with the head of an ibis or a baboon.

The museum’s ticket agent was killed during the storming of the building, according to the Antiquities Ministry.

View gallery.”

FILE -- In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, …

FILE — In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, Damaged pharaonic objects lie on the floor

Under the threat of sniper fire on Saturday, Hanna and a local security official were able to salvage five ancient Egyptian sarcophagi, two mummies and several dozen other items left behind by the thieves.

The museum was a testament to the Amarna Period, named after its location in southern Egypt that was once the royal residence of Nefertiti. The area is located on the banks of the Nile River in the province of Minya, some 190 miles (300 kilometers) south of Cairo.

When Hanna asked a group of teenagers wielding guns to stop destroying the artifacts that remained, they said they were getting back at the government for killing people in Cairo, she said.

“I told them that this is property of the Egyptian people and you are destroying it,” she said in an interview Monday. “They were apparently upset with me because I am not veiled.”

After managing to chase them away, a group of men began opening fire to try to force her and the security official to leave. She said the men were apparently also in charge of the boys, who had burned one mummy completely and partially burned another, while pushing around a half-ton statue from the Old Kingdom of the third millennium B.C.

FILE -- In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, …

FILE — In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, damaged pharaonic objects lie on the floor

“We were working and lowering our heads so they do not fire on us. There were snipers on rooftops,” she said.

The two were able to salvage some 40 artifacts and thousands of broken pieces that Hanna said will take archaeologists years to put back together. The Egypt Heritage Task Force, a group of Egyptian archaeologists who use social media to try to raise awareness about illegal digging for artifacts and looting, said 1,050 pieces were stolen from the museum.

The head of museums for the Antiquities Ministry, Ahmed Sharaf, said two statues were returned Monday. He told The Associated Press that police and ministry officials will not press charges or arrest anyone who comes forward with looted items and that a small financial reward is available for returned artifacts.

He said that until now, police have been unable to secure the museum. He accused members of ousted President Mohammed Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood, who have been spearheading protests against the government, of being behind the looting and attacks on the nearby police station.

Hanna said the looting was more likely carried out by heavily armed gangs of thieves who took advantage of the lawlessness to target the museum.

FILE -- In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, …

FILE — In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, a damaged object lies on the floor of the Malawi …

The chaos erupted Wednesday when security forces in Cairo, authorized by the new military-backed government, cleared out two Islamist-led sit-ins demanding Morsi be reinstated, igniting violence that has killed more than 1,000 people.

The Great Pyramids west of Cairo and the Egyptian museum in the heart of the city were closed during the country’s bloodiest day last week. At least 30 tanks line the streets outside Egypt’s main museum in Cairo.

Some looting occurred during the 18-day uprising in early 2011 against autocratic President Hosni Mubarak. More than 50 items were stolen from the Cairo museum, but Sharaf said around half have been recovered.

Never, though, was the looting then or at any other time since on the scale seen last week, according to archaeologists and ministry officials.

In the past two years of instability since Mubarak’s ouster, illegal digs have multiplied and illegal construction has encroached on ancient, largely unexplored pyramids.

Also threatening sites is the view held by some hard-line religious allies of Morsi who view Egypt’s ancient history as pagan.

The Malawi Museum was in many ways a tribute to the heritage of Minya and home to chests, coffins, masks and hematite stone with Hieroglyphic inscriptions used for measuring. The looters also made away with sculptures associated with the deity Thoth, who ironically, is known as an arbitrator of disputes.

FILE -- In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, rows of display cases are broken and empty at the Malawi Antiquities Museum after it was ransacked and looted between the evening of Thursday, Aug. 15 and the morning of Friday, Aug. 16, 2013 in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt. The theft of about 1,000 artifacts spanning some 3,500 years of history from a small antiquities museum south of Cairo showcases the tenuous security in the provinces. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper, File) EGYPT OUT

FILE -- In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, Damaged pharaonic objects lie on the floor and in broken cases in the Malawi Antiquities Museum after it was ransacked and looted between the evening of Thursday, Aug. 15 and the morning of Friday, Aug. 16, 2013, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt. The theft of about 1,000 artifacts spanning some 3,500 years of history from a small antiquities museum south of Cairo showcases the tenuous security in the provinces. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper, File) EGYPT OUT

FILE -- In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, damaged pharaonic objects lie on the floor of the Malawi Antiquities Museum after it was ransacked and looted between the evening of Thursday, Aug. 15 and the morning of Friday, Aug. 16, 2013, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. The theft of about 1,000 artifacts spanning some 3,500 years of history from a small antiquities museum south of Cairo showcases the tenuous security in the provinces. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper, File) EGYPT OUTFILE -- In this Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 file photo, a damaged object lies on the floor of the Malawi Antiquities Museum after it was ransacked and looted between the evening of Thursday, Aug. 15 and the morning of Friday, Aug. 16, 2013, in Malawi, south of Minya, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013. The theft of about 1,000 artifacts spanning some 3,500 years of history from a small antiquities museum south of Cairo showcases the tenuous security in the provinces. (AP Photo/Roger Anis, El Shorouk Newspaper, File) EGYPT OUT

Categories: Egyptology, History, Mish Mash | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Day at the MET

7/18/13

We decided to do the MET today because it was supposed to be even hotter than yesterday. I met the girls on the steps of the MET at 9:30am. I got to the steps around 9:36am and could immediately tell that the museum was not open yet. It was supposed to open at 9:30am. We waited and sweated. It was over 100 degrees and there was no shade. We eventually got into two single file lines. I was soaked. This was redic. They should have had us wait inside the lobby. Everyone could have been shopping in the gift shop while we were waiting. They finally let us in at 10. Janelle paid $3 but the lady gave her back $1. I paid $3. Lauren paid $5. We hit the gift shop first. I saw several things I wanted to buy, but I wanted to wait to do it until we were done in the museum. I have been to the MET numerous times. The last time was 2 years ago and I spent an entire day there (opening to closing). So I’ve done all of the museum, but I love the place. I was excited to do it again.

Lauren’s picture. Janelle is on the steps

We started in the Egyptian section. We did Perneb’s tomb. I read some of the glyphs for Lauren and pointed out important pieces. I explained many of the items and funerary rituals. We ran into some of the girls’ Contiki tour mates. We did the Temple of Dendur which looked particularly pretty today since there was a ton of sunlight pouring in. I took them to my favorite galleries, 126 and 130. We used the restroom and Janelle decided to head out. She wanted to get back to her hotel and change before her Sex in the City Tour. We said our goodbyes. I was sad to see her go. I wish I could have spent more time with her. 😦

Lauren and I then headed to the Greek and Roman area. They are always wonderful to look at. We saw a piece called the Boxer that was temporarily lent to the museum. So I had never seen it before. There was a guy sketching it and he was doing a really great job. After that we headed to the area on Central America. We found one of my favorite areas in the museum which are the French rooms. It is like being transported to Versailles. I then took Lauren to see the Patio from the Castle of Vélez Blanco which makes you feel like you stepped into Romeo and Juliet. We then headed upstairs to do the second floor.

The Boxer

We started with the paintings. We looked at Picasso, Monet, Van Gogh, etc. After we came out of the painting area I saw a sign for the Punk exhibit. I’ve always wanted to do the Costume Institute at the MET, but never get around to it. So we did a detour to see the exhibit. There was no photography allowed. The clothes alternated between very strange and awesome. Some of the outfits were made out of everyday items like garbage bags. Many of the outfits seemed a bit more gothic than punk which is my taste. There were also some great shoes. There was one pair that was gladiator style from Versace and went all the way up the leg.

Then we headed to the Asian section. This section is filled with Buddhas and Hindu statues. However, my two favorite parts of this section are the Vadi Parshvanatha Jain temple (gallery 243)  and the Chinese Courtyard (gallery 217). Unfortunately, both were closed this time. We were still able to see the top of the temple though. There were some new items that I had never seen before including animals made out of bubbles. I also saw some of beautiful clothes. One gallery had a view of the Temple of Dendur, which is a view I wish I had.

After that we wandered over to the Art of Arab Lands. I had only seen a little bit of this exhibit because the last time I was here the majority of it was closed. Last time I looked at the items from Mesopotamia. I enjoyed seeing the Moroccan Court (gallery 456), the Damascus Room (gallery 461), the Mihrab (gallery 455), and all the Qurans and rugs. I was sad that the Assyrian Royal Court (gallery 401) was closed. I would have liked Lauren to see it. We got to see the special exhibit on the Cyrus Cylinder.

The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia: Charting a New Empire

Image from the MET’s website

Before we left I wanted to make sure Lauren saw the American Wing, which consists of the facade of the Branch Bank of the United States that they turned into a mansion filled with colonial rooms, paintings, furniture, and other artifacts. I love this part of the MET. It reminds me of the White House and I can easily picture our founding fathers walking around inside. One of my favorite rooms in the MET consists of images of Versailles and its gardens.

At that point it had been about four hours and I knew we were both tired and Lauren was probably hungry. Even though we hadn’t seen everything I figured it was time to go. We used the restroom and headed to the clearance shop and the regular shop. I bought two books (both on sale), an Egyptian pencil case (I always wanted one), and two postcards. Lauren picked up several items as well.

Even though it was extremely hot outside I figured Lauren might want to see some of Central Park since tomorrow was supposed to be even hotter and they might not get to it. I used my phone to plot out a path to Cleopatra’s Needle (otherwise I would get hopelessly lost because I seriously hate the park). We found the needle pretty quickly and though we were beyond melting and we stayed to admire it and take some pictures. I knew there was another interesting site nearby but I couldn’t remember where. So we wandered for a bit in the direction of the water and found a statue that said Poland on it. At that point my iphone was getting pretty hot so I put it away. Lauren took some pictures and we decided to find our way back. Our way back wound up being along a very long path. Thank goodness I read somewhere that the numbers on the lampposts tell you what direction you are heading, what block you are near, and how long until you hit the street, otherwise I would have felt that we were going to walk forever. We saw a statue of Hamilton on our way out. The path let us out at 85th and 5th and we had entered at 79th or 80th and 5th.

We originally were headed to H&H Bagels for lunch which is located at 81st and 2nd. So we walked the avenues while sweating buckets. We were both weighed down with big heavy bags from the MET. Every time we missed the light we would hide in the shade. We got to 85th and Lexington and I explained to Lauren how many more blocks we would have to walk to H&H. I told her Shake Shack was a block away and she agreed. We got to Shake Shack and it was very busy. We shared a table with a woman. I was soaked! My dress was drenched. I hate the heat!  Lauren got a cheeseburger, fries, and a water. I just got an ice cold water. That cold water was the most beautiful thing on Earth at that moment. I was too hot to really eat. I ate one of her fries and they were good. We chatted for a while about debt, university tuition, rent, homes, apartments, etc. I walked Lauren to 86th and 3rd and we said our goodbyes. I was sad to leave them. It had been a very hot but nice two days.

I went to H&M and caught an air conditioned train back home.

The results of my shopping in the last two days

Categories: Egyptology, History, NYC, Travel, USA | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spinning Manchester Museum Egyptian Statue Debunked

A Manchester classmate of mine posted this link so I thought I would share it with all of you.

All rights belong to Mick West and Metabunk. To view the original post please click here.

Debunked: Ancient Egyptian Statue Rotating by Itself in Manchester Museum

Discussion in ‘Fortean phenomena‘ started by Mick West, Jun 23, 2013.

Manchester Museum is getting a lot of publicity for a video of a statue that slowly rotates through the course of the day. It’s on a glass shelf, and it only moves when there are people walking nearby.

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This raises the obvious suggestion that the rotation is simply due to the vibration. The statue is hard uneven stone, and the glass shelf is very hard and perfectly flat. When two hard substances are in contact with each other, then there’s not much friction because there are limited points of contact. I suspect that the base of the statue is uneven, which allows it to tilt and pivot very slightly from the vertical vibration from people walking by. The shelf is very slightly tilted towards the front, so the statue rotates until the center of gravity is at the lowest point, and then it stops.

Firstly the issue of object moving on a glass shelf visitor induced vibration from wooden floors is a known problem in the museum industry, see:
http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/content/imported-docs/u-z/vibration-rio.pdf

To test this theory out, I made a functional replica of the situation using a glass table, a piece of wood with some screws in for the hard uneven base, and a container of salt for the statue.

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(Skip to 0:35 in the following video to see the experiment)

Initial tests showed that the movement and rotation of the statue varied a lot based on the geometry of the base – i.e. the relative height of the screws. Adjusting one screw a fraction of a turn could entirely change the behavior. So it’s pretty random that the statue ended up moving the way it did.

As I did not have lots of people to walk around my table for days I accelerated the process by angling the table probably slightly more than the shelf (it’s still only 2 degrees though), and by directly vibrating the table. This is obviously not the same as what happened – the magnitudes are different, but the concept is the same.

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Some inevitable questions:

Why has it never moved before?
Firstly its obvious that that it’s not been on that exact same shelf for “decades” or “80 years” as some news stories report. In fact that’s the new Ancient World Gallery, which opened around Oct 2012), so it’s been there for a few months at most. The curator simply said it had been on a similar shelf before.
Secondly, experiments show the motion is dependent on circumstances. So something must have changed, but only very slightly – the slope of the shelf, the position of the statue on the shelf, even the position of other objects can affect the vibration. Even a very slight shift in the frame of the building could be responsible.
And perhaps the previous curators had been sensible, and secured it to the shelf with a dot of wax.

Why are the other statues not moving?
Because they are different. They are smaller, they are shorter, they have a more centered center of gravity, they are made of different materials, they have different bases, they are in different positions.

Why does it spin exactly 180 degrees?
Because the shelf is sloped very slightly down towards the front of the cabinet, so it stops when the center of gravity gets to the lowest position.

Why does it go round in a circle?
Because it’s pivoting on a point in the base. In my experiment this is represented by the center screw, which is just a tiny bit more protruding than the others. But the actual geometry will vary.

Why does it rotate so slowly when yours goes so fast?
Because of the magnitudes of things. The vibration is less in amplitude, the pivoting on the base is smaller, the slope is less. So it’s doing to very large number of much smaller motions.

What about:

A) The museum employees was working in the gallery, so perhaps they caused the vibration themselves
B) Vibrations could come from people in other rooms, or upstairs.

Categories: Egyptology, Mish Mash | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spinning Ancient Egyptian Statue at the Manchester Museum

A friend of mine shared this article with me because this is happening in the museum that belongs to my university. I’ll let you know if my Egyptologist professors comment about it. All rights belong to DailyMail, Amanda Williams, and the University of Manchester. To see the original article click here.

Is this ancient Egyptian statue a sign that there really is a curse of the Pharaohs? Relic of the god of death found inside mummy’s tomb and kept in museum for 80 years starts SPINNING on its own

  • 10-inch tall relic, is an offering to Egyptian God Osiris, God of the dead
  • It has been filmed on a time lapse, seemingly spinning 180 degrees
  • TV physicist Brian Cox among the experts being consulted on mystery
  • But some now believe there could be ‘spiritual explanation’ for turning statue

By Amanda Williams

PUBLISHED: 03:10 EST, 23 June 2013 | UPDATED: 10:07 EST, 23 June 2013

It sounds like the something from the script of a Hollywood action adventure.

But the ‘mystery of the moving mummy’  –  which has seen an Egyptian statue mysteriously start to spin round in a display case – has spooked museum bosses.

The 10-inch tall relic, an offering to the Egyptian God Osiris, was found in a mummy’s tomb and has been at the Manchester Museum for 80 years.

But in recent weeks, curators have been left scratching their heads after they kept finding it facing the wrong way. They now believe there could be a ‘spiritual explanation’ for the turning statue.

Egyptologist Campbell Price studies an ancient Egyptian statuette at the Manchester Museum, which appears to be moving on its ownEgyptologist Campbell Price studies an ancient Egyptian statuette at the Manchester Museum, which appears to be moving on its own

It is believed that there is a curse of the pharaohs which strikes anyone who dares to take relics from a pyramid tomb.

Experts decided to monitor the room on time-lapse video and were astonished to see it clearly show the statuette spinning 180 degrees – with nobody going near it.

The statue of a man named Neb-Senu is seen to remain still at night but slowly rotate round during the day.

Now scientists are trying to explain the phenomenon, with TV physicist Brian Cox among the experts being consulted.

The 10-inch tall relic, which dates back to 1800 BC, has been at the museum for 80 years but curators say it has recently starting rotating 180 degrees during the dayThe 10-inch tall relic, which dates back to 1800 BC, has been at the museum for 80 years but curators say it has recently starting rotating 180 degrees during the day

Scientists who explored the Egyptian tombs in the 1920s were popularly believed to be struck by a ‘curse of the Pharaohs’.

Now Campbell Price, a curator at the museum on Oxford Road, said he believes there may be a spiritual explanation to the spinning statue.

Egyptologist Mr Price, 29, said: ‘I noticed one day that it had turned around.

‘I thought it was strange because it is in a case and I am the only one who has a key.

‘I put it back but then the next day it had moved again.

Experts decided to monitor the room on time-lapse video and were astonished to see it clearly show the statuette spinning 180 degrees - with nobody going near itExperts decided to monitor the room on time-lapse video and were astonished to see it clearly show the statuette spinning 180 degrees – with nobody going near it

In this time lapsed video, as the museum closes for the evening, the statue can be seen in a clearly different positionIn this time lapsed video, as the museum closes for the evening, the statue can be seen in a clearly different position

By midday the next day it has turned almost a quarter of a circle to be facing to the leftBy midday the next day it has turned almost a quarter of a circle to be facing to the left

The following morning the statue has moved again, and is facing even further away from its original positionThe following morning the statue has moved again, and is facing even further away from its original position

By the end of the day the statue has turned almost 180 degrees and is now facing away from visitors to the museumBy the end of the day the statue has turned almost 180 degrees and is now facing away from visitors to the museum

‘We set up a time-lapse video and, although the naked eye can’t see it, you can clearly see it rotate on the film.

‘The statuette is something that used to go in the tomb along with the mummy.

‘Mourners would lay offerings at its feet. The hieroglyphics on the back ask for ‘bread, beer and beef’.

‘In Ancient Egypt they believed that if the mummy is destroyed then the statuette can act as an alternative vessel for the spirit.

‘Maybe that is what is causing the movement.’

Other experts have a more rational explanation – suggesting that the vibrations caused by the footsteps of passing visitors makes the statuette turn.

That’s the theory favoured by Professor Cox – but Campbell said he was not convinced.

‘Brian thinks it’s differential friction,’ he said.

‘Where two surfaces, the serpentine stone of the statuette and glass shelf it is on, cause a subtle vibration which is making the statuette turn.

But it has been on those surfaces since we have had it and it has never moved before. And why would it go around in a perfect circle?’

Campbell is urging members of the public to come along and take a look for themselves.

‘It would be great if someone could solve the mystery,’ he added.

Spooky! Egyptian statuette spins untouched inside glass case

If the video doesn’t work click here to go to the original article to see it.

Categories: Egyptology, Mish Mash | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Modern Day Boston Tea Party

April 26 2013

My mom got me a 7-11 corn muffin to start my day in Boston. We checked out of the Courtyard Marriott and wheeled our suitcases through the streets of Boston to the Hyatt Regency. We had stayed here before so we knew what to expect. We were upgraded to a suite on the top floor because it was my birthday weekend and because we are members. The suite wasn’t ready yet so we had to leave our bags and start our day.

On our walk to the water we passed a bunch of food trunks. My mom stopped at the Cookie Monstah truck and got a red velvet cookie. She asked for one with a lot of chips and they gave her one without any. She asked for a different one. They gave her a different one, but it was burnt. 😦

We walked over to the water to do the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum. I had read about the museum when they first opened and have been wanting to go ever since. The tickets are expensive, but they are worth it. I bought them online to save $5 total. We arrived right before the 1pm tour. Only one other couple was on our tour. There were several actors in costume that were there to guide us and help recreate the night of the Tea Party. They stayed in character the whole time and were quite funny. The tour starts with a town meeting and everyone gets a card with their identity and feather for their disguise. Then you go on the ship and dump the tea overboard. Afterwards, you explore the ship and can take pictures. After that we learned more about the night and boycott from holograms that looked real. We got to see one of the two remaining tea chests and hear from Sam Adams and King George III (think Hogwarts moving pictures). Then we watched a film about the battle of Lexington and Concord. The tour was about an hour and it was very well done. The tour ends at Abagail’s Tea Room. The tour guides saw me mouthing all the answers so they spoke to me after the tour about my love of history. The gift shop had a wide variety of items. I got several postcards, tea, and a t-shirt. They make you say haazah a lot, which is cute. I really wish I could take my students here.

We got a call from the hotel that our room was ready so we walked back to the hotel. We put our bags in the room and went back out. We stopped at the Old Granary Burying Ground where Samuel Adams, Franklin’s family, Paul Revere, John Hancock, and several others are buried. We took some pictures and left. We got on the train at Park St Station and got very lost inside the station. We eventually got on the right train to the Museum of Fine Arts.

We went to the MFA after 3pm so I could be free (I look like I’m under 18). We visited the Egyptian section first. I enjoyed explaining to my mom what everything was. She actually admired several pieces. The death and burial section also known as the Mummy Room is the best part of the exhibit. I also loved a rare statue of two women. One had her arm around the other. We saw the Greek and Roman statues. We also did a little bit of the Assyrian and Mesopotamian section. We looked at several of Monet’s paintings and saw the famous paintings of Sam Adams, John Hancock, the Washingtons, and Paul Revere. The special exhibit was on the Samurai warriors and we enjoyed that as well. However, we saw several similar artifacts in Les Invalides in Paris. The museum had many great items, but I still think the MET, Louvre, and National Archaeological Museum are better.

We debated about where to go for dinner. We finally settled on Max and Dylan’s. I got a turkey cranberry avocado sandwich with fries to go. My mom picked up a red velvet whoopie pie from 7-11. We took all out food back to the hotel. I had the sandwich and she ate my fries and pie. As we ate we watched a Law and Order SVU marathon. Overall, it was a great first day in Boston.

Courtyard Marriott Lobby

Masonic Temple

Park St Church

Categories: Boston, Family Vacation, Food, History, Travel, USA | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Penn Museum

As I have previously mentioned I am studying for my certificate in Egyptology. So I try to see as many museums as I can that have Egyptian exhibits. I had never been to the Penn museum so we decided to go and take a look. The Penn Museum is on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania so we got to look around as we walked to the museum. The museum has a discount for AAA members, which shaved off a couple of dollars.

We started with the Egyptian exhibit. They have a great timeline that I took pictures of and still refer back to. There was a giant sphinx and there were several architectural pieces that belonged to Merenptah. There were numerous statues of the gods. They also had several mummies, some had undergone the artificial mummification process and some had gone through the natural mummification process. Additionally, there were artifacts from the Amarna period. There were some large busts but some were replicas. There was a copy of the Narmer Palette and of the Rosetta Stone.

After looking at the Egyptian exhibit we walked through the rest of the museum. There were some great pieces from Asia. I enjoyed looking at the dragons and Buddhas. There was also a copy of Hammurabi’s code. I spent a lot of time looking at the Greek statues. They also had a large collection of Greek Pottery. There were so many that it reminded me of the museums in Greece that were filled with them. The gift shop is small, but it has an entire room dedicated to Egypt. Many of the items were expensive and that was because many of them came from Egypt. I owned several pieces so I only bought some postcards. We eventually ran out of time in the Mexican and Central American section.

The museum is definitely worth seeing and is easy to get to via public transportation. I would allow at least two hours here.

King Tut

Akhenaten

Neferkheperure-Waenre
Akhenaten
Nefertiti

Ptah

A serekh

Sekhmet

Osiris

Replica

Ramesses II

Canopic Jar
Duamutef
Contains the stomach

Copy of the Narmer Palette

Hercules

That’s a big nail

I’m with the replica of Hammurabi’s Code

Penn Museum

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Egyptology, Family Vacation, History, Philadelphia, Travel, USA | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Egypt Uncovers Tunnels Used to Steal Treasures

This is so horrible. We’ll never know how much has been stolen.

Here’s the article (rights belong to BBC). Click here to see the video and the article.

27 March 2013 Last updated at 20:09 ET

Since the revolution in Egypt, large holes have been appearing in the ground close to places of archaeological significance, such as the Great Pyramids at Giza.

As the BBC’s Aleem Maqbool discovered, it seems that people have been digging underground tunnels in order to find archaeological treasures.

The problem extends to southern Egypt too, and to Luxor, once the great ancient capital city known as Thebes.

Over the last two years, the police there have been inundated with audacious cases of people tunneling for antiquities.


The security forces gave the BBC some extraordinary video footage they had taken of the vast tunnel networks that have been discovered.

Categories: Egyptology, History, Mish Mash | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Statues, Paintings, and Artifacts, O MY!

July 27 2012

After officially checking in to our hotel we started our walk to Le Orangerie and the Louvre. I mapped out a path that would allow us to see some other sights and walk through the Tuileries.

We passed Place Vendome first. It was surrounded by very fancy expensive stores. We took some photos and kept going. I was excited to see Place de la Concorde since it is Egyptian. The Obelisk of Luxor was given to Paris by Mohamed Ali.  The obelisk, 22.83 meters high and weighing 230 tons, which marked the entrance to the Temple of Luxor, was installed in 1836. I loved that the obelisk and the Eiffel Tower were diagonal from each other. It made for a great picture.

We went to Le Orangerie because of Monet’s Water Lilies. The museum was free with our museum pass. We had to check our bags and cameras. Monet’s work was incredible and definitely made me glad that we stopped. They encompassed the whole room. Then we went downstairs to see the other pieces of art. I was surprised that I recognized some of the paintings and some of the artists. We stopped at the gift shop so I could buy some postcards. We were only there for 30 minutes, but we really didn’t need any more time. We went right before they closed so it was almost empty.

We walked through the Tuileries. I kept thinking about King Louis XVI and his contemporaries leisurely strolling around the Tuileries. The ferris wheel surprisingly didn’t seem strange. There was a mix of tourists and locals walking around. We approached Place du Carousel and took pictures on both sides. I can’t believe the statues on top were once completely made of gold.

The Louvre looked absolutely enormous. I can’t believe people once lived in it. The pyramid didn’t bother me. I guess that’s because I am so used to seeing it in movies, pictures, and documentaries. Our museum pass allowed us to skip the super long line and walk right in. We chose to come on the Louvre’s late night. I decided to have us start with what used to be the moat and then the Egyptian exhibit. My mom was super tired and wasn’t interested in the Egyptian artifacts. I left her on a bench and ran through all the rooms snapping pictures. I really wanted to spend time examining each item, but I couldn’t. I really wish I could go back and spend half a day looking at them. Since my mom was so tired we tried to just walk to see all the highlights. We saw the Napoleonic Apartments, Winged Victory, Venus de Milo, and the famous paintings of the renaissance. My friends Janelle and Megan warned me that the Mona Lisa was going to be very small. They were right! It was super packed in front of the painting. I took a couple of pictures and kept moving. We went back to the lobby area. I dropped my mom off at a bench. I looked around the gift shop and everything was just too expensive. The cheap books on Egypt were in French. O well. I still needed to see Hammurabi’s Code and I wasn’t leaving without seeing it. I ran through a bunch of exhibits and passed Greek and Roman statues. I found Hammurabi’s Code and took a bunch of pictures. I ran back and was officially exhausted. I was looking for the inverted pyramid that Dan Brown talked about, but didn’t see it.

We started to walk back to the hotel and passed a bunch of souvenir shops. We picked up a t-shirt and a couple of other things. We also passed a cookie place and bought a small bag. We made those cookies our dinner. We went back to the hotel and settled in. We soaked our feet in hot water and went to bed.

Categories: Europe, Family Vacation, France, History, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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