Posts Tagged With: Israel

Shalom Jerusalem

Jan 2 2009
Our landing was pretty rough and security took forever. Josh got my bag for me and Collin put it on the bus. We met our guard/medic (Leo/Lior), our tour guide (Shabat), and our bus driver (Moishe). We drove to Jerusalem. We were in a rush because of Shabbat.

The scenery we passed looked like Greece. There were signs welcoming us, which was very cool. We saw the new bridge and a lot of Hebrew graffiti.

We got to our hotel, Shalom Jerusalem, and I found out my roommates were Rachel and Sarah from Lehigh. Jordi was with Lindsey and Jen. Our room is 1624. The elevator took forever! We changed and went to shabbat dinner. I sat with all the Lehigh kids plus Noah, Ben, Travis, and Daryl. The wine was awful. I ate rice, potatoes, and carrots. The bread was stale. The pumpkin pie was way too spicy and the chocolate mousse was awful. However, the vanilla cake was great.

We then had a meeting about the size of Israel, our schedule, the rules, etc. Then we played a name game where we went around in a circle saying our name, an adjective that starts with the letter of our name, and an action. We had to remember everyone’s. I picked Jolly Jackie.

Then Shabat gave us a book, schedule, emergency card, and a scarf. I really liked the scarf. I picked black with blue lettering.

The room is ehh. It’s a fair size with a nice view. The bathroom is a nice size. However, the hair dryer barely works and the shower floods. Also, the toilet takes forever to fill. The sheets are very dirty. O well.

Sarah and I took the beds and Rachel took the cot. We went to bed at midnight.

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Categories: Asia, Food, Israel, Travel, Trip with a Tour Group | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Year-New Country

Jan 1 2009
The trip started off with killing time before the airport. We were able to find my group because of the sign Jacob was holding high in the air. I introduced myself to Anna and Stacy, our group leaders, and got a bag of candy from them. I eventually walked over to Lindsey and I met her step sister Jen. I think we will all get along.

Once we got through El Al interrogation we had to say goodbye to our parents. It was sad. A little later I said goodbye to Lindsey and Jen’s parents who hugged me. I thought that was super sweet. Security went surprisingly smooth. Lindsey, Jen, and I dropped our stuff off at B31, which was our gate. We got food to eat for dinner and for the plane. It cost $10. Then we started to play Uno, but Anna stopped us to play a name game, which was fun.

We boarded and I found out that I was in the last row. Everyone but Jordi and I played musical chairs. Daryl put my bag in the overhead for me. Later in the flight Zac and Ricky took Sarah and Jacob’s seats in our section.I read two mags, 60 pgs of my book, looked through the airline mags, talked, watched Nights in Rodanthe, and watched a really bad Israeli dancing show. The food was awful!!! My vegetarian meal wasn’t ordered for me. I ate a roll and a brownie from the El Al food. I ate the bagel and cookie I bought in the airport. The stewardess felt really bad and was really sweet. What I thought was strange was that El Al just takes off without any warning.

Categories: Asia, Israel, Travel, Trip with a Tour Group | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Israel

I went to Israel in January of 2009 with Birthright Hillel. We had a unique experience because shortly after we arrived Israel invaded Gaza. It is referred to as the 12 Days War (there are other names as well) and we were in Israel for 12 days. More information about Birthright, Hillel, and the war can be found below. Additionally, you can find the link to all my videos from Israel and the trip plan below. Posts from the 12 days will be coming soon.

Birthright

Hillel

12 Days War

Videos from Israel

Trip Plan

Postcards from Israel

Israel Map

Categories: Asia, History, Israel, Travel, Trip with a Tour Group | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

5th Anniversary of my Trip to Israel Tomorrow

I have decided to re-release my blog posts on Israel. Tomorrow will mark the 5th anniversary of my trip to Israel so I figured what better time to do it. My Israel posts were my first ones I posted on this blog so I had no idea what I was doing. 🙂 The majority of you haven’t read them yet so enjoy reading about my journey through Israel. It was a great trip despite the fact the country was at war. When you are done with my journey through Israel I promise I will have some new travel content for you. I still have lots of places left to write about. I have been lazy lately. I will try to do better in the New Year!

Categories: Asia, Israel, Travel | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Couple Finds 2,000-Year-Old Archaeological Treasures Under Their House

Love this article.

All rights belong to The Blaze, Sharona Schwartz, and Yahoo!

To view the original article click here

The Blaze

Sharona Schwartz September 16, 2013 11:12 AM

When Miriam and Theo Siebenberg purchased a plot of land for their new home in the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem’s Old City that Israel had just a few years before captured from Jordan, they had no idea of the antiquity treasures dating back from Jesus’ time and before that lay underneath.

Before the Siebenbergs built their house in a neighborhood where archaeological finds were regularly cropping up, Israeli Department of Antiquities inspectors examined the site, but found nothing of historical significance that would have stopped construction.

.The Couple That Found 2,000 Year Old Archaeological Treasures under Their House

Siebenberg-Museum-Tazpit

Descending into history at the Siebenberg House (Photos Credit: Tzuriel Cohen-Arazi/Tazpit News Agency)

In 1970, they moved into the new home and were soon to discover how wrong the inspectors had been.

At the time, archaeologists from the Hebrew University were excavating all around the Jewish Quarter.

“I went over one day and asked the archaeologists if they had checked the area where my house was,” Theo Siebenberg told the New York Times in 1985. “They said they had and that they were sure nothing was there.”

But to Siebenberg, that answer didn’t seem right.

“I would stand here and picture myself in the Second Temple Period. The temple was just over there,” he told the Times, pointing to the nearby Western Wall, the most holy site in Judaism. “Why wouldn’t Jews have built here then? Every inch of land near the Temple must have been very valuable.”

.The Couple That Found 2,000 Year Old Archaeological Treasures under Their House

Siebenberg-House-Digging

The enormously challenging digging project in the early 1970s (Photo courtesy: Siebenberg family)

So he took matters into his own hands. He approached the engineers who had built his new house, asking if he and his wife could conduct an archaeological dig underneath. They told him that if an excavation upset the stability of the land, it could cause the neighborhood to slide down the hill.

Still, he didn’t give up.

Engineers came up with a pricey plan to construct a restraining wall held down by steel anchors which would secure his neighbors’ homes. A wealthy man, Siebenberg was able to fund the project independently, according to media accounts 30 years ago, and to guarantee his neighbors that he would pay for any damage the dig might inflict on their homes.

So the wall was built and the Siebenbergs were able to embark on their treasure hunt. They hired a team of architects, engineers, archaeologists, laborers and even donkeys to bring the rubble up from down below.

It was only after eight months of digging that they found their first artifact, a bronze key ring from the era of the Second Temple which may have been used as a key to a jewelry box.

.The Couple That Found 2,000 Year Old Archaeological Treasures under Their House

Siebenberg-Second-Temple-Era-Ring-Tazpit

The first find: a bronze key ring from the Second Temple period (Photos Credit: Tzuriel Cohen-Arazi, Tazpit News Agency)

Soon after, they came across an abundance of ancient archaeological treasures. Among them: the wall of a 2,000-year-old home, two mikvehs (Jewish ritual baths), arrowheads possibly used by Jews defending themselves from the Romans, a Byzantine water cistern, an ivory pen and an ink well. Encouraged by their finds, they dug further. Sixty feet below, they found empty burial chambers believed to be at least 2,600 years old, dated to the First Temple.

“The Siebenberg excavation is not only a monument to determination and plain bull-headedness, but an engineering and structural marvel,” wrote Biblical Archaeology Review in a 1982 article about the project.

.The Couple That Found 2,000 Year Old Archaeological Treasures under Their House

Siebenberg-Arrowhead

Arrowheads on display at the Siebenberg House (Photo courtesy: Siebenberg family)

After digging for 18 years, they converted the lower levels of their house to a museum where visitors can view the ancient treasures and descend into the excavation to feel what it was like to dig into ancient history.

For Theo, the project was motivated by his personal quest to find his roots. At age 13, he was forced to flee Belgium to escape the Nazis. After moving around Europe and eventually to the U.S., he felt he was missing a connection with Jewish history. His wife Miriam tells TheBlaze that he dedicated his life to finding a true home he felt he had lost in Europe.

The project “was motivated by wanting to find his roots. My husband was born in Antwerp. He felt like a boy without a home. He was searching for a spiritual home,” Miriam says.

“All of the investment and the dedication and effort were aimed at finding the home he was looking for his whole life. That was the idea, finding the historical continuity,” she adds.

The Siebenbergs decided to one day donate the museum and its contents to the Israeli public. They have set up a non-profit organization for that purpose.

You can view many more photos of the museum and collection on their Facebook page.

(H/T: Tazpit News Agency)

Categories: Asia, Israel, Mish Mash, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learning Local Words

I find that it is important to learn a couple phrases and/or words in the native language of the country you are visiting. They can be used in a pinch in case you are in an area where they don’t speak English and at the very least it makes the locals happy that you are trying. I often see Americans get angry at tourists that don’t know basic words like bathroom, yes, thanks, etc. Yet those same people don’t learn any when they go away. Here are some of the words and phrases I have picked up over my travels.

Egypt (Arabic):

Yalla-Let’s go

Habibi-Good friend/dear friend

Salam=Hello

Shukran=Thank you

La Shukran=No thank you

Ma batkalemsh Arabi=I don’t speak Arabic

Insha’allah=G-d Willing

Israel (Hebrew):

Shalom=Hello

Boker Tov=Good morning

Erev Tov=Good evening

Layla Tov=Good night

Toda=Thanks

Ken=Yes

Lo=No

Eyfo=Where

Anglit=English

Mayim=Water

Sherutim=Bathroom

Greece (Greek):

Kali Mera=Good morning

Kali Spera=Good evening

Efharisto=Thanks

Parakalo=Please

Nero=Water

Kafe=Coffee

Xenodohio=Hotel

Tyrí=Cheese

Epidórpio=Dessert


Aruba (Papiamento)

Bon bini=Welcome

Con ta bai?=How are you?

Danki=Thanks

Bon=Good

Dushi=Sweet

Bon dia=Good morning

Bon tardi=Good afternoon

Bon nochi=Good night

Ayo=Bye

Pasa un bon dia=Have a good day

Di nada=You’re welcome

Por fabor=Please

Mi ta bon=I am good

Dushi soño=Sweet dreams

Halo=Hello

Baño=Bathroom

Playa=Beach


France (French)

Merci=Thanks

Bonjour=Good morning/afternoon

Bonsoir=Good evening

Bienvenue=Welcome

Au revoir=Goodbye

Toilettes=Bathroom

Metro=Metro

Fromage=Cheese

Pain=Bread

Avion=Plane

Aéroport=Airport

Billet=Ticket

Musée=Museum

Pharaons=Pharaohs

Advertisements in other languages of movies or products that you have back home also help you pick up on words. Like the one below.

20130910-201601.jpg

Categories: Africa, Aruba, Asia, Caribbean, Egypt, Europe, Greece, Israel, Mish Mash, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Massive Submerged Structure in Sea of Galilee

My boss brought this to my attention and I thought it was worth sharing. I will go back to posting updates from my trips this weekend. Needed a break for a bit.

All rights belong to the Daily News

You can view the original article here

Massive submerged structure in Sea of Galilee stumps Israeli archaeologists

A massive circular structure at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee has puzzled Israeli researchers who have been unable to excavate it. Now archaeologists are trying to raise money to allow them access to the submerged structure, which is made of boulders and stones.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Friday, May 24, 2013, 2:00 PM

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File - In this April 14, 2011 file photo, a boat is by the jetty of the Capernaum National Park in the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel.  The monumental structure, made of boulders and stones with a diameter of 70 meters, was found through a sonar scan at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee in 2003. Now, archaeologists are beginning to put together grant proposals and funding requests in a bid to permit them access to the submerged stones.(AP Photo/Bernat Armangue, File)

Bernat Armangue/AP

A boat on the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel. A massive structure, made of boulders and stones with a diameter of 230 feet was found through a sonar scan at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee in 2003.

The massive circular structure appears to be an archaeologist’s dream: a recently discovered antiquity that could reveal secrets of ancient life in the Middle East and is just waiting to be excavated.

It’s thousands of years old — a conical, manmade behemoth weighing hundreds of tons, practically begging to be explored.

The problem is — it’s at the bottom of the biblical Sea of Galilee. For now, at least, Israeli researchers are left stranded on dry land, wondering what finds lurk below.

The monumental structure, made of boulders and stones with a diameter of 230 feet, emerged from a routine sonar scan in 2003. Now archaeologists are trying to raise money to allow them access to the submerged stones.

“It’s very enigmatic, it’s very interesting, but the bottom line is we don’t know when it’s from, we don’t know what it’s connected to, we don’t know its function,” said Dani Nadel, an archaeologist at the University of Haifa who is one of several researchers studying the discovery. “We only know it is there, it is huge and it is unusual.”

Archaeologists said the only way they can properly assess the structure is through an underwater excavation, a painstakingly slow process that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. And if an excavation were to take place, archaeologists said they believed it would be the first in the Sea of Galilee, an ancient lake that boasts historical remnants spanning thousands of years and is the setting of many Bible scenes.

In contrast, Israeli researchers have carried out many excavations in the Mediterranean and Red Seas.

Much of the researchers’ limited knowledge about this structure comes from the sonar scan a decade ago.

Initial dives shortly after that revealed a few details. In an article in the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology published earlier this year, Nadel and fellow researchers disclosed it was asymmetrical, made of basalt boulders and that “fish teem around the structure and between its blocks.”

The cone-shaped structure is found at a depth of between three and nine and 40 feet beneath the surface, about 1,600 feet from the sea’s southwestern shore. Its base is buried under sediment.

The authors conclude the structure is man-made, made of stones that originated nearby, and it weighs about 60,000 tons. The authors write it “is indicative of a complex, well-organized society, with planning skills and economic ability.”

The rest is a mystery.

Yitzhak Paz, an archaeologist with the Israel Antiquities Authority who is involved in the project, said that based on sediment buildup, it is between 2,000 and 12,000 years old, a vast range that tells little about it. Based on other sites and artifacts found in the region, Paz places the site’s origin some time during the 3rd millennium B.C., or about 5,000 years ago, although he admits the timeframe is just a guess.

“The period is hard for us to determine. No scientific work was carried out there, no excavations, no surveys. We have no artifacts from the structure,” Paz said.

Archaeologists were also cautious about guessing the structure’s purpose. They said possibilities include a burial site, a place of worship or even a fish nursery, which were common in the area, but they said they wanted to avoid speculation because they have so little information.

It’s not even clear if the structure was built on shore when the sea stood at a low level, or if it was constructed underwater. Paz reckons it was built on land, an indication of the sea’s low level at the time.

In order to fill in the blanks, archaeologists hope to inspect the site underwater, despite the expense and the complexities.

Nadel noted that working underwater demands not only a skill such as scuba diving, but also labor-intensive excavations that are particularly difficult in the Sea of Galilee, which already has low visibility and where any digging can unleash a cloud of sediment and bury what’s just been uncovered.

Also, divers can remain under water only for a limited amount of time every day and must choose the best season that can provide optimal conditions for excavating.

“Until we do more research, we don’t have much more to add,” Nadel said. “It’s a mystery, and every mystery is interesting.”

Here’s another article. All rights belong to Scotsman.com:

Mystery of giant structure under Sea of Galilee

Sonar of the mysterious object. Picture: compSonar of the mysterious object. Picture: comp

Published on 24/05/2013 08:28

Archaeologists are keen to explore a massive structure which was discovered beneath the biblical Sea of Galilee near Israel, which could reveal the secrets of ancient life in the Middle East.

The mysterious object, said to have a diameter of around 230 metres, is a large circular conical shape and was initially discovered in 2003, but scientists are looking to explore the area on the seabed in what would be an expensive feat.

Constructed from giant boulders, the unknown structure has archaeologists and historians stumped, as the area features several times in various biblical tales.

Estimates have put the age of the structure anywhere between 2000, and 12,000 years old, and is indicative of a highly organised society.

A sonar sweep in 2003 showed the monument, but it is thought that an underwater excavation would be the only way to learn more about it, a process which could prove lengthy and expensive.

Categories: Mish Mash | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Postcards from Israel

Here are my postcards from Israel. This should be all of them. If I find more I will add them to the set on flickr. To view the set click here. To view the slideshow on flickr click here.

Categories: Asia, Israel, Postcards | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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