Posts Tagged With: Osiris

Valley of the Kings

Sorry that I haven’t written in a while. Just needed a break this week. Let me get back to my adventure in Egypt. Last time I left you I was in Luxor visiting the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut.

8/4/11

We got off the bus and walked through the vendors. I saw a shirt I wanted and made a mental note that I would try to get it on the way back to the bus. We went to a big  room, which had a model of all the tombs in the valley. Sherif spoke to us for a bit there. I paid to use the bathroom and then went outside to join the group. We had to catch a tram to the tombs. However, some of the vendors got on the tram, which they aren’t allowed to do. So we stopped and had to wait for them to get off. Sherif handed us our 3 tomb ticket. Michael, Paul, and I purchased tickets to see King Tut’s tomb and Ramesses VI’s tomb. Sherif wasn’t allowed in the tombs so he showed us which ones to go into and gave his speeches outside of the tombs.

The first tomb we went into was KV 2, which belongs to Ramesses IV. The tomb has a red granite sarcophagus and has many smaller side rooms. The images of Nut on the ceiling were incredible. Paul and I noticed a decoration on one of the walls that I thought looked like papyrus. Sherif didn’t know what it was, but in the end we found out I was right. The entrance to this particular tomb seemed very long. Unfortunately, you are not allowed to take pictures in the tombs. The Theban Mapping Project provides images, descriptions, and diagrams of the tombs. They are definitely worth looking at.

Next was KV 11, which belongs to Ramesses III. Sonja decided to pay the tomb guy to guide her. I didn’t need that, so I left them. When they were building this tomb they actually hit KV 10 and had to shift the tomb over a bit. This tomb had a lot of cobras in it. It also had a wonderful scene of Ramesses offering Maat to Osiris.

The next tomb was KV 16, which belongs to Ramesses I. This one was very deep and had a lot of steps to get in. The tomb guard wanted to show me around, but I kept shooing him off. I didn’t want to pay. The scenes in this tomb were so vivid! There were beautiful images of Horus, Osiris, Atum Ra Khepri, Maat, and more. All of these images were on a blue background. There was even a sarcophagus that filled up almost the entire room. It was so dusty and Michael put his hand prints on it. The guard came over and started talking to us and at this point I decided to leave. I wasn’t paying him. At the top of the steps I didn’t feel well. The heat, the depth, and the stairs were starting to get to me. No wonder Alli got sick when she came out of this tomb. I started to walk away and got harassed by a vendor. For once my Arabic wasn’t working on him. I didn’t have the energy to fight with him. He eventually gives me a book as a gift and refuses to take it back. At that moment Paul and Michael come out of the tomb with the guard. I could tell right away that something was wrong. The guard wants to get paid and the boys don’t have money. I’m forced to pay him. I’m not happy. Now the vendor sees I have money and demands to be paid for the book he shoved in my hands. I was eventually going to buy the book anyway so I look through my wallet for money. The smallest note I have is 20LE, but the book is 5LE. The vendor takes the 20LE out of my hand and refuses to give me change. I cause a scene. He gives me another book. Now he owes me 10LE. I want my change and he claims he doesn’t have any. I’m not letting him get away with my money. So I demand he at least give me more merchandise. He gives me two postcard books. I’m pissed at the whole situation.

We go into KV 9 and I am beyond agitated. This tomb belongs to Ramesses VI and was never finished because he died before it was completed. The ceiling was incredible and showed Nut swallowing Ra. There was also very colorful cartouches. The room at the end was quite large and there was a piece of a granite sarcophagus. Sherif had told us there would be images of strange guys on the ceiling, He said they looked like aliens or Buddha. He was completely right! There was a great double image of Osiris. There was also a memorable image of Meretseger.  There was just so much to see.

Last but not least was the long awaited tomb of King Tut otherwise known as KV 62. It was only fitting that the last historical thing we will be doing in Egypt would be Tut’s tomb. The tomb had a short staircase entrance. On the right of the tomb was the room Tut was originally buried in. His gold sarcophagus was in the middle of the room under the glass. On the back wall there was an image of Nut greeting Tut, the opening mouth ceremony, and finally Osiris, Tut, and his ka. On the other side wall was a scene with 6 baboons. Tut’s mummy was in the antechamber. Thank goodness I had my flashlight otherwise you wouldn’t be able to see it. I couldn’t believe I was staring at Tut after all this time. I was surprised more of the group didn’t want to see this tomb. After all, this probably the most famous tomb in Egypt.

We headed back to the “visitor center.” I wish I could have seen more tombs. I easily could have spent the whole day there. I used the bathroom. I then went to that t-shirt vendor. He wanted 170LE ($34) for the t-shirt. I got him down to 25LE ($5). The funny thing is I walked away and he followed me all the way to the bus. I wound up buying the shirt right as I got on the bus.

Categories: Africa, Egypt, History, Travel, Trip with a Tour Group | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Temple of Horus at Edfu

8/3/11

I woke up exhausted. This morning we were heading to the Temple of Horus aka Temple of Hours at Edfu aka Temple of Edfu. We had to have an early start to beat the heat and make it to Luxor on time. There was no time for breakfast so I ate my cereal in the lobby. We grabbed water bottles and walked to our horse and buggies, which are called calashes. Mike, Sonja, Nicole, and I got into #54 because it had a plastic seat. Mike sat by the driver because Sherif had told us girls we shouldn’t. As we rode we got to see typical Egyptian life. Lots of people were waiting in line for bread for dinner.

Edfu from my window

Edfu from my window

Edfu from my window

Calash

Calash

We pulled into an area in front of the Temple of Horus. We were the first ones into the complex and we actually had to wait a minute or two until the temple opened. Paul, Sonja, and I walked in front with Sherif. It was great because we were able to get pictures without anyone being in our way. We all took pictures for a while and then Sherif talked to us about the temple and the outside. It was a shame that people cut holes into the entrance wall because they were living there.

I spy the Temple of Horus

Temple of Horus

Temple of Horus

We then went into the main courtyard where there were statues of falcons. We went further back into a dark room that was somewhat destroyed due to the fires of the Christian squatters. Sherif had me read the part before the cartouches aka Sa Ra (son of Ra/Re) and Nisut Bati (King of Upper and Lower Egypt). In addition, he asked me to the read the name Ptolemis aka Ptolemy. We went further back into the sanctuary where there was a boat used for ceremonies. To the right there was a great image of Nut on the ceiling. A room close by had images of the gods going up the stairs. When we went to the left of the sanctuary there were images of the gods embracing Ptolemy. There was also another staircase showing the gods coming down the stairs. We went into a hall where Sherif showed us the glyphs for 100 (a spiral) and for a village. We came across my favorite image, which is Ptolemy being crowned King of Upper and Lower Egypt. I couldn’t believe I was finally seeing this image in person! He also showed us where the Egyptians used to tie up their animals to the temple walls. That was pretty cool.

Ptolemis aka Ptolemy

Life and Dominion

Nut

Heading upstairs

King of Upper and Lower Egypt

Heading downstairs

Horus and Ptolemy

Being crowned King of Upper and Lower Egypt

Next we moved to another hall, which records the first play about Osiris, Isis, Horus, and Seth. In the end Horus is victorious. My favorite image was of all the “actors” holding hands and bowing. Before we left Sherif pointed out the huge images of the pharaoh participating in ceremonies. These images acted like a big screen TV for people who came to see the ceremonies. He then took us to the side and walked us through the rest of our day. He explained to us about the guys throwing stuff on the boat near the Esna locks so they can sell it to us. I already knew about this so I didn’t really listen.

Final scene. That’s Horus and Seth (he’s being harpooned)

Gods/Actors about to take a bow

Ramadan Lamps

We boarded our calash and by accident I dropped Michael’s water into the street. O well! We board the boat and it was time to sail to Esna and Luxor.

Categories: Africa, Egypt, History, Travel, Trip with a Tour Group | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Watching the Sun Set at Kom Ombo

8/2/11
We took a shuttle from the plane to the airport and then a bus back to our boat. Once we were all aboard we set sail.

My luggage still didn’t arrive. 😦 I went to lunch because I felt ill and wanted real food. I had super yummy mashed potatoes and some bread. I went back to my room to get cold for a bit. I watched MTV cribs. I also watched the Nile from my bed.

About 3 hrs later it was time to meet Sherif to see Kom Ombo. Sonja, Paul, Michael, and I were the only ones going. Sherif took Sonja and I outside to a tiny ledge so we could watch us pull into Kom Ombo. One false step and we would be in the Nile. We disembarked and walked to the temple.

Sunset was coming and the temple looked beautiful. There were still remnants of color in spots and the hues were brilliant. Sherif showed us a scene that contained images of medical supplies and one where a woman was giving birth. The temple was dedicated to Sobek and Haroeris (Horus the elder). It’s rare for two gods to share a temple. People used to wait to get treated here and you could still see the games and drawings they carved into the floor while they waited. There was an image on the temple wall of a lion biting the hands of its enemies. There was a picture of Cleopatra since the temple dates from the Ptolemaic Dynasty. Sherif kept saying, “Come I show you the best picture.” This kept cracking us up.

Cleopatra

The sun started to set and the place became magical. We took pictures holding the sun. Mike started not to feel well and was looking pale. Sherif sent him back to the boat because he’s had people faint in this temple before, which is strange because it wasn’t hot. I didn’t want to leave because it was like stepping back in time. It was so quiet and peaceful. Sherif showed us the Nilometer and where they kept the alligator.

It was time to break Ramadan for the day so we walked back to the boat. We saw a museum they were building. I asked Sherif what his favorite Egyptian site was and he said Abydos. That’s where Osiris’ head is supposedly buried. Random strangers offered Sherif food and water. He accepted the water.

We went back on the ship and Sherif went straight to dinner with the crew. I went to the top deck and watched Kom Ombo slip away. Everyone on the deck said they didn’t go because they felt they saw it from the boat. All they could see was the top part sticking out from the trees. They really missed out. The four of us who went loved it.

Categories: Africa, Egypt, History, Travel, Trip with a Tour Group | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spinning Ancient Egyptian Statue at the Manchester Museum

A friend of mine shared this article with me because this is happening in the museum that belongs to my university. I’ll let you know if my Egyptologist professors comment about it. All rights belong to DailyMail, Amanda Williams, and the University of Manchester. To see the original article click here.

Is this ancient Egyptian statue a sign that there really is a curse of the Pharaohs? Relic of the god of death found inside mummy’s tomb and kept in museum for 80 years starts SPINNING on its own

  • 10-inch tall relic, is an offering to Egyptian God Osiris, God of the dead
  • It has been filmed on a time lapse, seemingly spinning 180 degrees
  • TV physicist Brian Cox among the experts being consulted on mystery
  • But some now believe there could be ‘spiritual explanation’ for turning statue

By Amanda Williams

PUBLISHED: 03:10 EST, 23 June 2013 | UPDATED: 10:07 EST, 23 June 2013

It sounds like the something from the script of a Hollywood action adventure.

But the ‘mystery of the moving mummy’  –  which has seen an Egyptian statue mysteriously start to spin round in a display case – has spooked museum bosses.

The 10-inch tall relic, an offering to the Egyptian God Osiris, was found in a mummy’s tomb and has been at the Manchester Museum for 80 years.

But in recent weeks, curators have been left scratching their heads after they kept finding it facing the wrong way. They now believe there could be a ‘spiritual explanation’ for the turning statue.

Egyptologist Campbell Price studies an ancient Egyptian statuette at the Manchester Museum, which appears to be moving on its ownEgyptologist Campbell Price studies an ancient Egyptian statuette at the Manchester Museum, which appears to be moving on its own

It is believed that there is a curse of the pharaohs which strikes anyone who dares to take relics from a pyramid tomb.

Experts decided to monitor the room on time-lapse video and were astonished to see it clearly show the statuette spinning 180 degrees – with nobody going near it.

The statue of a man named Neb-Senu is seen to remain still at night but slowly rotate round during the day.

Now scientists are trying to explain the phenomenon, with TV physicist Brian Cox among the experts being consulted.

The 10-inch tall relic, which dates back to 1800 BC, has been at the museum for 80 years but curators say it has recently starting rotating 180 degrees during the dayThe 10-inch tall relic, which dates back to 1800 BC, has been at the museum for 80 years but curators say it has recently starting rotating 180 degrees during the day

Scientists who explored the Egyptian tombs in the 1920s were popularly believed to be struck by a ‘curse of the Pharaohs’.

Now Campbell Price, a curator at the museum on Oxford Road, said he believes there may be a spiritual explanation to the spinning statue.

Egyptologist Mr Price, 29, said: ‘I noticed one day that it had turned around.

‘I thought it was strange because it is in a case and I am the only one who has a key.

‘I put it back but then the next day it had moved again.

Experts decided to monitor the room on time-lapse video and were astonished to see it clearly show the statuette spinning 180 degrees - with nobody going near itExperts decided to monitor the room on time-lapse video and were astonished to see it clearly show the statuette spinning 180 degrees – with nobody going near it

In this time lapsed video, as the museum closes for the evening, the statue can be seen in a clearly different positionIn this time lapsed video, as the museum closes for the evening, the statue can be seen in a clearly different position

By midday the next day it has turned almost a quarter of a circle to be facing to the leftBy midday the next day it has turned almost a quarter of a circle to be facing to the left

The following morning the statue has moved again, and is facing even further away from its original positionThe following morning the statue has moved again, and is facing even further away from its original position

By the end of the day the statue has turned almost 180 degrees and is now facing away from visitors to the museumBy the end of the day the statue has turned almost 180 degrees and is now facing away from visitors to the museum

‘We set up a time-lapse video and, although the naked eye can’t see it, you can clearly see it rotate on the film.

‘The statuette is something that used to go in the tomb along with the mummy.

‘Mourners would lay offerings at its feet. The hieroglyphics on the back ask for ‘bread, beer and beef’.

‘In Ancient Egypt they believed that if the mummy is destroyed then the statuette can act as an alternative vessel for the spirit.

‘Maybe that is what is causing the movement.’

Other experts have a more rational explanation – suggesting that the vibrations caused by the footsteps of passing visitors makes the statuette turn.

That’s the theory favoured by Professor Cox – but Campbell said he was not convinced.

‘Brian thinks it’s differential friction,’ he said.

‘Where two surfaces, the serpentine stone of the statuette and glass shelf it is on, cause a subtle vibration which is making the statuette turn.

But it has been on those surfaces since we have had it and it has never moved before. And why would it go around in a perfect circle?’

Campbell is urging members of the public to come along and take a look for themselves.

‘It would be great if someone could solve the mystery,’ he added.

Spooky! Egyptian statuette spins untouched inside glass case

If the video doesn’t work click here to go to the original article to see it.

Categories: Egyptology, Mish Mash | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Penn Museum

As I have previously mentioned I am studying for my certificate in Egyptology. So I try to see as many museums as I can that have Egyptian exhibits. I had never been to the Penn museum so we decided to go and take a look. The Penn Museum is on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania so we got to look around as we walked to the museum. The museum has a discount for AAA members, which shaved off a couple of dollars.

We started with the Egyptian exhibit. They have a great timeline that I took pictures of and still refer back to. There was a giant sphinx and there were several architectural pieces that belonged to Merenptah. There were numerous statues of the gods. They also had several mummies, some had undergone the artificial mummification process and some had gone through the natural mummification process. Additionally, there were artifacts from the Amarna period. There were some large busts but some were replicas. There was a copy of the Narmer Palette and of the Rosetta Stone.

After looking at the Egyptian exhibit we walked through the rest of the museum. There were some great pieces from Asia. I enjoyed looking at the dragons and Buddhas. There was also a copy of Hammurabi’s code. I spent a lot of time looking at the Greek statues. They also had a large collection of Greek Pottery. There were so many that it reminded me of the museums in Greece that were filled with them. The gift shop is small, but it has an entire room dedicated to Egypt. Many of the items were expensive and that was because many of them came from Egypt. I owned several pieces so I only bought some postcards. We eventually ran out of time in the Mexican and Central American section.

The museum is definitely worth seeing and is easy to get to via public transportation. I would allow at least two hours here.

King Tut

Akhenaten

Neferkheperure-Waenre
Akhenaten
Nefertiti

Ptah

A serekh

Sekhmet

Osiris

Replica

Ramesses II

Canopic Jar
Duamutef
Contains the stomach

Copy of the Narmer Palette

Hercules

That’s a big nail

I’m with the replica of Hammurabi’s Code

Penn Museum

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Egyptology, Family Vacation, History, Philadelphia, Travel, USA | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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